Category Archives: Cliff Spencer Furniture Maker

Desk Progress

It has been a busy summer for all of the BoxCo members but  some time has been made for progress on the new CAFAM front desk. Here’s a quick sneak peek as it sits in Cliff Spencer Furniture’s shop awaiting its top!

CAFAM – the before

Out with the old (desk) and in with the new…

Craft and Folk Art Museum

It’s quite rare indeed that the L.A. BoxCo gets to pool their talents and resources to produce a singular piece, together as a group. We’ve fortunately come across that opportunity with a new design for the entry desk of the Craft and Folk Art Museum across from LACMA on Wilshire. This tiny gem on Museum Row shows some really delightful exhibitions and is definitely worth a visit, especially if you’ve never been there.

Andrew Riiska taking some measurements.

The old desk is currently being demolished with all of its hardware to be repurposed for the future project. The new desk will be a perfect fit for the museum which promotes excellent design and craft, not to mention it will be made locally with sustainable methods.

So check back here to see the desk progress!

The Dunnage Show at Inheritance

LA Box Collective at AltBuild 2011

AltBuild 2011 is this weekend. Come say hello and meet members of the LA Box Collective at the Santa Monica Civic Center, this Friday and Saturday, May 6th and 7th. Admission is FREE.

The crew has big plans! Come see what we have and learn about sustainable building and remodeling resources.

Urban Logs to Flying Furniture

Okay, the furniture will not actually fly. It will all live at the Wing House, in Malibu, an amazing architectural creation by architect, David Hertz and his recycling savey client. The project already re-uses a decommissioned 747 airplane and much of the unique structures left of Tony Duquette’s estate that weren’t destroyed by fire. There are other ambitious projects as well, using other fire salvage items in the decor and landscape.

We were brought in to salvage some gorgeous urban lumber for a number of furniture pieces throughout the property, indoor and outdoor.

First, we brought in Brent Cashion, from Urban Logs to Lumber.

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Now our furniture and cabinet shop is full of some amazing lumber. All salvaged from the property or other developed land. I’ll keep posting as things progress. This is my favorite sort of project.

So Happy Together

The BoxCo Debut Exhibition has moved from AltBuild and now resides at Fifth Floor in Chinatown.  The reception will be Saturday, June 12th, from 6-9pm.  We hope to see you there!  Also, you can check out some more images of all the pieces here.

BoxCo Installation at Fifth Floor

-Robert Apodaca

California Lumber Safari

What did you do this holiday weekend? We took a trip to Santa Cruz, CA to see some friends and decided to stop to visit a unique salvage wood source in Atascadero, CA. About 175 miles North of Los Angeles on the 101, Forgotten Woods has an amazing inventory of exotic and domestic salvaged hardwoods.

Forgotten Woods is ideal for the wood turner, but there are lots of treats for a furniture maker as well.

The figure on the exotic species are amazing to see the least, but we were very interested in the work that Rusty, one of the owners, does in his tree clearing business. Salvaged trees have histories, stories to tell. Like most lumber-philes, Rusty knew the stories of his harvest and shared them with us.

Monterey Cypress

This Monterey Cypress is a map of a battle between two neighbors, where one side of the fence continually cut off the branches and the other side let it keep growing. The tree just grew over the trimmed limbs.

White Oak

This is a seventeen foot long, 3 foot wide white oak tree that would make an amazing dining room table.

Myrtlewood

Elm

If the tree is not slab-worthy, Rusty cuts walnut, myrtlewood, elm and sycamore in to blocks for turning.

Reclaimed Ebony

This is some Ebony that apparently was sitting in a local man’s garage for 30 years, from when his uncle came back from a military post in the Philippines, where the lumber was used for fence posts. The uncle knew it was valuable wood, took it back to the US and distributed it among four nephews before he died. This particular nephew figured he hadn’t used it yet, so he hopes it will find a good home.

Scout and Rusty playing with hand-made wood tops and toys.

Woodworkers come in many types, from salt of the earth to presidential, but they all share a common craziness about the endless offerings of wood.