Tag Archives: urban salvage

Windfall Show Installation Shots

Our Windfall show is still going strong at the Craft & Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles. Here’s a few new installation shots for you to enjoy. All the amazing details are best appreciated in person so be sure to visit and support CAFAM!

photos by Robert Apodaca

 

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Windfall

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Windfall by Box Collective is on view at the Craft an Folk Art Museum from May 28 – September 4, www.cafam.orgThe exhibition consists of 15 works of furniture and objects made from salvaged trees, most of which fell in northeastern L.A. and the San Gabriel Valley during the historic windstorm of 2011.

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During the November 30th/December 1st storm, wind speeds reached up to 100 miles per hour. Nearly 5,500 trees were damaged in Pasadena, while hundreds more were destroyed in neighboring vicinities, including about 300 non-native and prehistoric species at the Los Angeles Arboretum & Botanic Gardens in Arcadia. Many logs from downed trees at the Arboretum were salvaged soon after the storm. Some were used for Forces of Nature, a show of artworks and objects made from the salvaged wood, on the first anniversary of the storm. Some were saved and carefully dried so that they could one day become fine furniture.

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Most of the works for Windfall are made out of this wood collected from the L.A. Arboretum’s fallen trees. David Johnson’s media cabinet is made from the entire trunk of a pink cedar, while designer Stephan Roggenbuck chose Lebanese cypress to make his bench. Cliff Spencer used pieces of a paulownia tree to make a sleek, contemporary beehive; a city scape of a sound diffuser; and a multi colored, folding screen. Furniture maker Harold Greene’s chaise lounge is built from bent laminated layers of a cedar of Lebanon. Woodworker Andrew Riiska salvaged a persimmon tree in the pouring rain to build his Grasshopper Lounge Chair and a bench that is part of his marshmallow forest installation in the CAFAM lobby. For his i table, William Stranger used a slab of paulownia, that came from a pair originally salvaged from the Arboretum for Forces of Nature.

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Some designers found material from trees that fell around their neighborhoods. Robert Apodaca’s hand-carved and scorched Blackout Bowls are made from recovered pieces of a eucalyptus tree that knocked over power lines near his home in Chinatown. William Stranger salvaged an Engelmann oak from a house near his studio in Pasadena for his Plane mirror. Casey Dzierlenga milled a fallen maple tree in her friend’s backyard in Montecito Heights to make the Lorca Coffee Table. Designers RH Lee and Samuel Moyer also incorporate wood from windstorms outside of Los Angeles into their pieces. RH Lee salvaged pieces of claro walnut in Santa Rosa, CA that have become end tables. Samuel Moyer’s Arrow Console is fabricated from an ironwood tree that landed on his truck in a Hudson River Valley windstorm in New York.

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On July 12th 65 people participated in a CraftLab family workshop with Box Collective members William Stranger and Andrew Riiska. Box Collective provided scrap wood as the raw material for an afternoon of creativity. Many interesting things were made.

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photography by Michelle Cho, William Stranger

Urban Logs to Flying Furniture

Okay, the furniture will not actually fly. It will all live at the Wing House, in Malibu, an amazing architectural creation by architect, David Hertz and his recycling savey client. The project already re-uses a decommissioned 747 airplane and much of the unique structures left of Tony Duquette’s estate that weren’t destroyed by fire. There are other ambitious projects as well, using other fire salvage items in the decor and landscape.

We were brought in to salvage some gorgeous urban lumber for a number of furniture pieces throughout the property, indoor and outdoor.

First, we brought in Brent Cashion, from Urban Logs to Lumber.

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Now our furniture and cabinet shop is full of some amazing lumber. All salvaged from the property or other developed land. I’ll keep posting as things progress. This is my favorite sort of project.

Saving Urban Salvage

Leigh here.

Our friend, Rick, is the manager of a large community in Los Angeles. Also an avid wood turner, he hates to see great lumber go to waste. As the manager, he knows when a mature tree in the area is going to be cut down, whether by a resident because they are landscaping, or if the city is chopping it down for fire safety or widening the freeway. He called Cliff and I to see if we wanted an 18″ diameter eucalyptus.

Enter, the LA Box Collective. We know that Samuel Moyer loves to break out his sawmill, so a few weeks ago, we did it.

By the end, we had quite a few nice pieces, and a lot of wet sawdust. This wood is really green, so it will have to dry for at least a year. It will probably be more appropriate for a dimensional piece, not a slab, but we’ll see how it dries. We found a nice place for ours to live in the shop until then.

What is crazy to me is that Rick let us know that the city will be chopping down two more even bigger trees in the next few months to make the freeway wider. (Wider! Don’t they know “if you build it, they will come, if you don’t they will carpool.” OK, that’s not a real quote. What do I know, maybe it’s for a light rail.)

Unless Rick or we or someone makes a concerted effort to save this lumber in our own city, it goes right to the landfill. Correction, usually it is chipped, and then put in a landfill. At the same time, there are beautiful old growth forests across the globe being harvested for lumber.

I ask you, does this make sense?